Exhibit Design and Marketing

RFP FOR YOUR BOOTH DESIGN [50 years of experience in the works]

Published on Jul 15, 2019 1:02:58 PM

 

GOOD DESIGN IS GOOD TRADE

AND, IT ALL STARTS WITH THE RIGHT RFP

 

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL .png

 

Your exhibit house needs enough information in a Request for Proposal (RFP) so the design team understands what your company goals are for the show. You are an expert on your company’s marketing goals and products, and the exhibit designers are experts in exhibit design.

You have a vision for how you would like the booth to look, and the exhibit designers have the training and experience to optimize that vision, and if given the right amount of information the designers can “Wow” your attendees with a booth design that tickles their imagination.

Let’s take a deeper dive into what your Request for Proposal (RFP) for a trade show booth should include.


Not too much, never too little

 

It is critical to give enough information, without overwhelming the designers, which can be a fine line.

1. Include company information.

2. Your competitive advantage, if you have one. If not, come up with an advantage that would lure your audience towards you.

3. Necessary product information.

4. What activities are you thinking of enacting. How does that tie in with collecting leads and giveaways.

 

INTERACTIVE play of technology

5. An order of importance in your communications for the show in the first paragraph.

The order of importance regarding communication goals always comes into play, especially when you are launching a new product, yet still showcasing your tried and true original product as well. Include your company’s achievements in this first section, but refrain from overemphasizing them.

As a marketer, it is ingrained into your writing to speak of your company on these terms, that’s great! Be upfront about your position in the industry then move on to outlining the overall brand message you want to send.

 

USE TECHNOLOGY TO MARKET YOUR EVENT

 

 

COIN OUT What’s New AND WHY SHOULD YOUR AUDIENCE CARE?

 

In the second paragraph of your new RFP, include information about new products in the coming year and/or any re-branding that might be done close to, or launched at, the show. This includes logos and any milestones for the company or product. Celebrating your 25th year and want to make it known on the show floor? Awesome! The designers can potentially highlight that achievement in your booth, but won’t know that it’s happening if you don’t work that into the messaging of your RFP

“You may be hesitant to share sensitive company and brand information, especially if it’s a big change for your product or company, but these changes are imperative to the design process. Signing a non-disclosure form takes the worry out of it.”

Worried the designers will create something “off-brand?” Send a copy of the branding guidelines to the designers to ensure all pieces of your marketing puzzle look cohesive on the show floor.

 

Below, one of our clients talking about brand coherence and brand competence in the global competitive market place

2018-BayArea-IMTS-Hoffman-F

 

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A BRAND GUIDE, HERE ARE 9 FACTORS THAT STRENGTHENS THE SPIRIT OF YOUR BRAND. DIG IN AND SEE HOW YOU WANT TO INCORPORATE THEM IN YOUR EXHIBIT DESIGN. CONVEY THEM IN YOUR RFP

 

 

 

QUANTIFY YOUR OBJECTIVES — Make them Known

 

1. In the next section, outline your desires, problems and needs.

2. What would you like the booth to accomplish for you?

3. Do you want your exhibit to be informational? Or, do you want it to be inspirational? Or, perhaps both.

4. Did you have a problem with the layout on your last booth that discouraged attendee interaction?

5. Does your product line need special electrical equipment for a demo? How much space do you need for the demo?

6. Will you be hosting a live speaker?

7. If you are showing product, include quantity and dimensions. The design of your booth should accommodate any activities you have planned.

 

“Communicating specific show goals in an RFP is what we are looking for.”

 


5 QUICK TIPS FOR A BUSY TRADE SHOW MANAGER
 

 

Past, Present & Future Trade Shows

 

The fourth paragraph of your RFP is all about where your company has been and is looking to go. This includes your company trade show history.

1. What has your budget been for past shows?

2. How many shows do you typically attend each year? About what size were the booths?

3. Are you considering going to more shows this year than last?

4. Would reconfigurable booths for your shows be an option?

 

“Knowing the past and future plans of your trade show attendance prepares us by giving a benchmark for what you are looking for, and what you hope to do in the coming years. If you plan for future events, incorporating a design that can be repurposed in many different booth sizes can increase your ROI.”

 

H-template for getting your trade show marketing right

HOW TO MEASURE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF YOUR PAST TRADE SHOW MARKETING — ANSWER AND AUDIT THESE QUESTIONS

 

 

Breakdown that Budget

 

Onto the big question mark:

PRICE.  If you find you are blindsided by the cost of an exhibit, ask yourself: did you thoroughly research the company, exhibit design process and industry standard cost?

Know what to expect and develop your budget off of that.

Be upfront about your Trade Show budget in this section, and what your budget includes.

“Segment your show budget into rental or purchase of the booth, content to be created, audio/visual components, shipping & drayage and promotional costs.”

Doing this gives your designers  a better idea of what they can create for you. Having a budget prepared means your design team won’t be blindsided by you asking to include audio/ visual content with $200 left in your budget.

This design team will become an extension of your own team. Take the time to talk, whether in person or on the phone, to build a relationship with this new team member and continue to keep them in the loop with your goals for the show.

 

YOUR ROI CALCULATOR AND MEASUREMENT TOOL



One Decision, Limitless Impressions

The best trade show designers will give you their best. That means you will likely be provided with one option (two if you insist on it).

If you have given all of the above information to the best of your ability in an RFP to a leading exhibit designer, and if you engage with them in the design process, then you will receive their best work, which will last in attendees minds long after the show floor lights dim.



50 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN THE WORKS

Please note  to formulate this article we sat down with Skyline Exhibits designers, who have a combined 50 years of experience designing in the trade show industry and were kind enough to help outline what you should include in your Request for Proposal document to have the most efficient, exceptional trade show booth design process and the best results when you get to the show.

 

There you have it, the entire process for submitting a Request for Proposal for a trade show booth design. It may seem like a lengthy process, but it is crucial to properly complete if you are sticking to a budget and timeline for the show. Good luck at your next show!

 

DESIGNS DEVOTED TO YOUR CUSTOMER JOURNEY


This article was first published in www.skyline.com

 

Topics: Silicon valley trade show booth design, Trade Show Booth Design, booth design, RFP

Join 140,000+ exhibitors who has profited from our insights

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

WHEN FORMULATING AN RFP, PUT YOURSELF IN THE SHOES OF YOUR AUDIENCE

THE FOUR STAGES THAT YOUR CUSTOMERS GO THROUGH BEFORE MAKING A DECISION
 
 
 
 
 
awareness
 
 

DO I KNOW YOU? 

AWARENESS STAGE

Is your prospect aware of your brand and your company. Is this the reason you are exhibiting at trade shows? If so, your exhibit booth design and your marketing offerings should align effectively to build awareness.

 
 
 
 
 
conviction
 

 

WHY SHOULD I CARE? 

COMPREHENSION STAGE

Does your prospect know about the product benefits and the factors that differentiate your product from that of the competition. Have you done a competitive audit. If yes, design an interactive booth that talks about your creative difference.

 
 
 
 
 
comprehension
 
 

PERSUADE ME

CONVICTION STAGE

Do you know the path, that you need to follow that will help your prospect to arrive at the mental disposition or conviction to buy. Use your exhibit design strategy to successfully execute persuasion. Come up ideas for the left brain and the right brain audience. Harness anxiety for results.

 
 
 
 
 
 
action
 

I THINK, I AM READY

ACTION STAGE

You have done your work. The prospect is aware of you, acknowledges your differentiators, is convinced that you have the right product, but, is yet waiting to make the decision to purchase. As an exhibitor, ponder, how will you help your prospect in taking the last step.

 
 
 
 
linear booth
 
 
 

EXHIBIT DESIGN AS AN EMANCIPATOR OF ANXIOUS MINDS THAT YOUR ATTENDEES SUFFER FROM —
FOCUS YOUR MESSAGES IN YOUR BOOTH DESIGN TO SPEAK TO THE QUESTIONS THAT YOUR AUDIENCE HAVE ABOUT YOUR BRAND —  THIS ACTS AS A CRUTCH TO HELP OUT YOUR BOOTH STAFFERS

 

booth design side with banners

 

 

WHEN IN DOUBT, GO WITH RENTAL EXHIBITS

 

The primary reasons for renting are mostly economic, but flexibility also plays a large role in the decision. We hope you will find this information useful as you plan your next trade show. The following infographic shows why exhibitors choose to rent, deciding factors on choosing a vendor, additional services they use, and future rental intentions.
 
 
 
RENTAL