Tradeshow Tonic

Bigger Isn’t Always Better

Published on Jul 10, 2014 11:59:00 AM

When it comes to trade shows and events, bigger isn’t always better. Sure a large 10,000 sq ft. exhibit is pretty impressive, but do you really require that much space to make your brand stand out and reach your event marketing goals? Here are a few reasons why a smaller space can make the same or better impact.

biggernotbetter

 

Spend more on marketing: When you don’t use your entire marketing budget on your booth space and exhibit expenses, you have more opportunity to reach and market effectively to your target audience. Think of pre-show mailers, email campaigns, at show promotions, hospitality events or more. These marketing initiatives can take your message and brand beyond the show and help turn more prospects into customers.

Empty space: Large exhibit space can often be intimidating. I have walked the halls of some of the largest convention centers and have seen some pretty massive exhibits. What I have also seen was wasted space, empty areas, no customers and no staff. I felt a bit lost and had to search out for employees working the exhibit to find someone, anyone to talk to. It seemed like a lot of empty, useless space on the show floor that had no reason of being there. Why pay for empty carpet you won’t use?

Face-to-face intimacy: When you exhibit at a show your key goal is to generate quality leads from target consumers. Sometimes smaller space allows for a more intimate conversation, better interaction and private demonstration of what you have to show. Large group demos are often good to tell a lot of people at once what you are selling, but at the same time, how many of those people do you approach or approach you after to discuss it further? Sometimes a smaller audience is better.

Projected amount of attendees: I have made the mistake of upgrading my booth space thinking the event will be as successful as the year before. I locked in my booth early to pay reduced fees and get the space I wanted. I knew the location of the next years venue so I assumed it would be a good turn out, I was wrong. I ended up paying for a larger space with not the same amount of success. I should have done my research on their estimated attendees rate and purchased my space accordingly. There is no reason to increase square footage if the same or fewer attendees are going to show up.

So when you are designing your next exhibit or choosing your exhibit space, factor in the other ways you can generate success and market your brand without paying out your nose on floor space. Some of these other efforts can pay off more in the long run and allow you a more intimate engagement with your audience.

 

What-Attendees-Tell-Us

Read the What Attendees Tells Us About Best Practices white paper to learn what it is attendees actually want to see when visiting your trade show booth. Learn what causes attendees to visit a booth and how you can better your trade show exhibiting experience.

 

About the Author: Gretchen Makela is the Director of Marketing for Skyline TradeTec and has over 15 years of experience in Marketing Management and Communications. She is an advocate of B2B events and trade show marketing – with a broad range of experience from a diverse range of industries. Her unique skills allow her to customize and implement new resources or tools for organizations and deliver an aggressive growth strategy. She enjoys all the varied elements of marketing and being a part of the evolution of a new brand as it comes to life.

Topics: trade show booths, Trade show booth staffing, Trade Show Booth Design, Trade show marketers, Trade Show Marketing

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